Skip to main content
Act-On Software

Embedding Video in Emails

 

Act-On does not currently support direct video embedding within our messages.

Embedded video has historically been a way to transmit malicious code to a recipients machine. This practice has resulted in email clients blocking video contents, moving messages containing embedded video to spam, and causing a decline to sender reputation.

Since most email clients do not support video playback in email, a static image or GIF is a good alternative.

Using a static image, you can create what appears to be a video player that links to your website, landing page, etc. giving your recipient a visual indication to click play. Once clicked, the recipient will be redirected to your landing page or website with the video embedded.

Get an image of the video

  1. To get an image of your video, visit YouTube (or wherever your video is hosted) and either Right Click > Save image as... on the video thumbnail or take a screen shot using Print Screen on your keyboard.
  2. Paste the image into your image editing program and crop it to leave the image of your video.
  3. This step optional, but can significantly increase the clickthroughs from your email. If you have an image editor that allows you to layer your images, add a play button. Most free image editors will allow you to do this.

Upload and add the picture to your email

  1. From the Design tab in the new message composer, add your image using either the Rich Text Block or Image Block. For this example I'm using the Image Block.
  2. Add the Target URL that points back to the web or landing page that has your video embedded.
  3. Add ALT text as a call-to-action text to open the video file, for recipients that turned off images in emails. If email images are turned off, the email client will display the ALT text of image, with the clear call-to-action text.

Result:

Most email clients will support the use of a GIF - an animated image that gives the effect of a video through a series of images or through a looping video playback. Keep in mind that you will still come across some email clients that will not support the use of GIFs, but the acceptance is widespread enough that most users will have a great experience.

If your message happens to hit an email client that doesn't support the use of GIFs - like Outlook 2007, 2010, and 2013 or Windows Phone 7, you can add a call-to-action on the first frame of your GIF. This way, if the message reaches an email client that doesn't support GIFs you will have a fallback image with a call-to-action.

Step 1. Create your GIF

There are a ton of programs that can help you create a GIF, the most popular being Photoshop. Depending on the program you use, you will be able to search around Google and find a tutorial for creating a GIF.

Step 2. Upload and add the GIF to your email

  • From the Design tab in the new message composer, add your GIF using either the Rich Text Block or Image Block. For this example I'm using the Image Block.
  • Add the Target URL that points back to the web or landing page that has your video embedded.
  • Add ALT text as a call-to-action text to open the video file, for recipients that turned off images in emails. If email images are turned off, the email client will display the ALT text of image, with the clear call-to-action text.

GIF Example:

  • Was this article helpful?